Tag Archives: build

Beware of Con Artists Looking to Prey on Homeowners After Hurricane Sandy

This entry was posted in Jason Parsons, Remodeling Industry Information, Tips for Selecting a Remodeler and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Although there are many people and companies available to help homeowners begin to repair or rebuild their damaged homes, there are unfortunately as many, if not more, out there looking to take advantage of homeowners in need.  Before you hire someone to work on your home, be sure to check their credentials first, even though you may be tempted to hire the first person that knocks on your door.

The first thing you should do is document all your damage using still pictures and video.  It is best to have the most accurate depiction of the damage, so taking detailed notes will help as well.  Next,   contact your insurance company or broker.  Understand what your policy covers, what your deductible is, and what the next steps towards repair should be.

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Design Build Remodeling Consultant

This entry was posted in Neil Parsons, Remodeling Project Design, Tips for Selecting a Remodeler and tagged , , , , , , , , , on by .

Okay, you are ready to get some information and price estimates on a major remodeling project. You schedule an estimate to have someone come to your home. What should you expect? How do you process the information?

Most shopping and purchasing and purchasing decisions that people make are based on their personal history of similar transactions. Major home remodeling is a rare purchase for many. History and experience are very limited and likely non-existent. People purchase more homes in their life than major home renovation projects. Continue reading

How Expensive is FREE in Home Remodeling?

This entry was posted in Jason Parsons, Neil Parsons, Remodeling Industry Information, Tips for Selecting a Remodeler and tagged , , , , , , , , on by .

Other than advice, a remodeler should never give a homeowner anything for free. Doing so potentially lessens the value of all you do and opens the door for constant negotiations, and even worse, re-negotiations of established costs.

Please do not misunderstand. This should not be confused with the concept of “under promising and over delivering.” Let’s face the facts. There is no one that works for free. Each person and trade gets compensated for their efforts. This compensation is a part of your job costing and affects a project’s gross profit if not accounted for when calculating the client’s investment amount. Continue reading